Dauphin Island’s East End Beach Recognized with Award

DAUPHIN ISLAND, AL (WKRG) – People in Dauphin Island have something else to be proud of. The East End beach was named one of the best-restored beaches in the country by the American Shore and Beach Preservation Association.

I went to the beach this morning during a break in the rain.  It was too windy to be a nice day, but the beach on the Island’s East End is getting an award because it is nice. Officials held a news conference highlighting the honor today. One mile of beach renourishment was finished last year. It protects surrounding properties like the Sealab and Fort Gaines and wildlife habitat.

Officials held a news conference highlighting the honor today. One mile of beach renourishment was finished last year. It protects surrounding properties like the Dauphin Island Sea Lab and Fort Gaines along with wildlife habitats.

“The erosion is getting up close to the bird sanctuary and the lake is a freshwater environment if the saltwater intrudes it would totally change the dynamics in that,” said Dauphin Island Mayor Jeff Collier.  The project cost almost seven million dollars, most of that comes from state funds according to Mayor Collier.  State Officials stressed the need to preserve the island.

“The town of Dauphin island as the only barrier island for the state of Alabama and the critical importance of this as a structural protector,” said the Director of State Lands Division Patti Powell.  The project also included a lot of regulatory hurdles including looking for old historic shipwrecks.

The project also included a lot of regulatory hurdles including looking for old historic shipwrecks.

“The Alabama Historical Commission requested that we perform very extensive and very detailed magnetometer surveying,” said Beau Buhring with South Coast Engineers.  This is Dauphin Island’s first beach renourishment project in the state’s 30 year30-yeary of attempts to restore the shore.

This is Dauphin Island’s first beach renourishment project in the state’s 30 years of attempts to restore the shore.

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